Ladies’ Night Vol. 6: Jill St. John in The Liquidator

Ladies’ Night Vol. 6: Jill St. John in The Liquidator

ladies night the liquidator

Originally, I’d planned on a little Diana Rigg action this week, but the chosen film that once existed on YouTube now can only be viewed in some mis-framed abomination that I just will not allow on my #Bond_age_ broadcast network. Never fear, I’ve taken the opportunity to order a UK DVD of the movie and Diana will make her Ladies’ Night appearance at a later date. What this means for you more immediately is that Jill St. John got moved up to fill Emma Peel’s shoes. I realize that this is not a one-for-one swap, but I have faith that the film that we are scheduled to view this week will make up for the Jill St. John to Diana Rigg deficit.

Jill St. John’s most visible big screen role was of course Tiffany Case in Diamonds Are Forever. But here are a few things about Jill St. John that you might not realize.

At age 11 in 1951, Jill St. John (born Jill Arlyn Oppenheim) appeared in two episodes of the George Burns and Gracie Allen Show. She signed her first motion picture contract with Universal at 16 and made her big-screen debut in Summer Love (1958) starring opposite John Saxon. She received a 1964 Golden Globe nomination for her performance in Come Blow Your Horn (which also featured a guy named Frank Sinatra). She also appeared in the first two episodes of the Batman television series as the Riddler’s moll Molly and appeared in “The Yada Yada” episode of Seinfeld with husband Robert Wagner.

jill st. john batman

Our Jill St. John movie of the week is the Rod Taylor-starring semi-sincere spy thriller The Liquidator (1965). Dropped in the middle of the spy-crazed 60’s, The Liquidator features a title-track sung by Shirley Bassey and a Lalo Schifrin score. Schifrin claimed to have consciously distanced himself from the Barry-style scoring done for the Bond films. Taylor plays Sergeant “Boysie” Oakes, an agent that literally “oopses” himself into the employ of the British secret service to eliminate leaks within the agency. Off the record, of course. Things go well until Jill St. John enters the picture (Isn’t that always the case? Get it? CASE? TIFFANY CASE?) and Oakes finds himself in over his head.

Join #Bond_age_ for the Ladies’ Night live tweet of THE LIQUIDATOR on July 19th @  9pm ET. Follow #Bond_age_ hashtag. An embed will appear on the Programming tab of this site. 

 

#Bond_age_TV: Remington Steele Vol. 9

#Bond_age_TV: Remington Steele Vol. 9


It’s been some time since we revisited the Laura and Remington show. We had some legit Bond business to attend to with all the milestone anniversaries. Great for #Bond_age_ fans, less so for #Bond_age_TV fans. Today I bring good tidings and more #SteeleTweet. This week we’re diving deeper into Remington Steele‘s second season. We’re diving so deep, indeed, that we’re hitting the next two episodes of the season. It might take us some time to navigate Season 2 because Remington Steele truly hits its stride with consistent quality and recognizable supporting players. There’s a reasons most fans cite Season 2 as the best of the show’s five-year run.

First up is a certifiable classic Steele episode called “Red Holt Steele.” What the episode lacks in classic movie references and guest stars, it makes up for with Steele and Laura action. You’ll see. (Bonus points for calling out the one standout movie reference.) The plot concerns a woman who thinks someone’s out to blow up her head husband’s aircraft company. Most notable in this episode perhaps is the director, Kevin Connor, who directed such 1970’s adventure classics as The Land that Time Forgot and At the Earth’s Core (starring Caroline Munro and other people, but let’s be honest. We watched that movie for Caroline).

Filling out our bill is the frenetic “Altared Steele,” an episode that more than makes up for the lack of supporting star players and movie references in “Red Holt Steele.” The high-concept premise is perfect for the Remington Steele detective company, an old fashioned whodunnit (or more accurately whosgonnadoit). An amnesiac believes one of his five ex-wives is trying to kill him — the only problem is which one. This episode features at least four movie references and Designing Women‘s Delta Burke, regular TV player Carole White, and Malcolm in the Middle mom Jane Kaczmarek.

Dust off your lady fedoras. This week it’s time to do some more investigating with Remington Steele. Join #Bond_age_ for the 9th Volume of Remington Steele live tweets on Wednesday, July 12th @ 9pm ET. We’ll be watching Episodes 3 and 4 from Season 2. Follow #Bond_age_TV hashtag.

remington steele

 

The Spy Who Loved Me Opening Remixed w/ The Last Shadow Puppets

The Spy Who Loved Me Opening Remixed w/ The Last Shadow Puppets

the last shadow puppets

I’ve had this song from the Last Shadow Puppets on the Opening-Remix back burner for years. I never quite found the right fit. Seeing as how this week marked the 40th Anniversary of The Spy Who Love Me, I figured I’d give it a shot at the big time. And, well, this is the result — The Last Shadow Puppets official audition tape for the title track on Bond 25. I feel like they’ve said all that’s necessary. Even the Hamlisch intro to the classic Carly Simon song functions admirably with “My Mistakes Were Made For You.” If there’s a non-Bond song that Bondier than this this, I’m not sure I know it. Enjoy. (And please, EON, do better than Sam Smith next time, okay? I think we’ve proven that you could have thrown a dart at the entire music industry and stumbled upon something more interesting.)

For those of you unfamiliar with the Last Shadow Puppets, they fall into the category of “supergroup” featuring Alex Turner (Arctic Monkeys), Miles Kane (The Rascals), James Ford (Simian Mobile Disco) and Zach Dawes (Min Masions). We’ve made the case for Arctic Monkeys as a Bond title-track artist on the #Bond_age_Pod, but in fact this side project of Arctic Monkeys lead-singer Alex Turner that better fits the bill. “My Mistakes Were Made For You” come from the band’s 2008 debut The Age of Understatement. The album was nominated for the prestigious Mercury Prize in the UK, falling victim to Elbow’s The Seldom Seen Kid.

Without belaboring the point of the band’s qualifications further… here’s The Last Shadow Puppets “My Mistakes Were Made for You” replacing Carly Simon on the title credits for The Spy Who Loved Me.

The Spy Who Loved Me Opening Remixed w/ The Last Shadow Puppets

The Spy Who Loved Me Opening Remixed w/ The Last Shadow Puppets from #Bond_age_ on Vimeo.

The Spy Who Loved Me 40th Anniversary Live Tweet

The Spy Who Loved Me 40th Anniversary Live Tweet

the spy who loved me 40th anniversary

If I need to introduce the 40th Anniversary of The Spy Who Loved Me I haven’t been doing my job. Roger Moore’s finest hour as Bond premiered on July 7th, 1977. All you need to do is show up and offer some amazing live twatter in respect.

#Bond_age_ live tweets The Spy Who Loved Me on Wednesday, July 5th @ 9pm ET. Follow #Bond_age_ hashtag. Check the Programming page for embed.

 

Licence to Kill “Just Because” Live Tweet

Licence to Kill “Just Because” Live Tweet


licence to kill just because

At a certain point early this year when I plotted out all the Bond anniversaries, I had a brain gaffe, a cloud perhaps, and listed Live and Let Die as old old 45er. As we all know, Roger Moore starred in Live and Let Die during the great year of 1973, not 1972. So.

That left an opening this week among three other Bond-versaries. I’d moved all the other regular programming around to make June an old fashioned month of #Bond_age_. No Tom Cruising. No Ladies Nights. No Year of the Spy. So when I suddenly had an opening, I consulted the #Bond_age_ viewers enjoying their slice of the 30th Anniversary The Living Daylights Live Tweet. Unanimously the entirety of Twitterdom called out “We want more Dalton! Let’s watch Licence to Kill next week!”

Okay, so it was two people and one of them, Krissy Myers, has a corner office at the #Bond_age_ volcano lair. (We tell her it’s a corner office, but since it’s a volcano it’s pretty clear to everyone that there are no specific “corners”.) How could I deny such high volume demand for more SMOLDER!?! I would never turn down more Smolder. I would never turn down Carrie Lowell. Nor Robert Davi’s iguana. Or Benicio’s “Honeymooooooooo….”

So this week join #Bond_age_ for the LICENCE TO KILL (just because) live tweet on June 28th @ 9pm ET. Follow #Bond_age_ hashtag. An embed for LTK will reside of the site for viewing. Also, worth noting: all future #Bond_age_ live tweet programming will be housed at www.thejamesbondsocialmediaproject.com/programming. <—Bookmark that page!

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